UNDERSTANDING DEPRESSION

Common issues related to depression

Sometimes people who experience depression are dealing with other things, too. Depression can trigger additional problems, or make existing ones worse. Learning about these related issues can make it easier for you or someone you care about to find the right support.

Anxiety disorders

Depression and anxiety are different, but they’re both common and often occur together.

Thoughts of suicide

Many people who die by suicide have a mental or emotional disorder. The most common underlying issue is depression.

Alcohol and drug use

It’s common to lean on things that may help numb negative emotions when you’re feeling low. But substance misuse can actually make depression worse. Part of getting help for depression is learning how to cope with feelings in healthy ways, without drugs or alcohol.

Relationship issues

Depression affects everyone it touches — not just people experiencing it, but their friends, family, and loved ones, too. Depression can create physical and emotional distance between people, even when they care deeply about each other. Communication is key — talking about what you’re both experiencing and getting the right support can help you get through tough times together and keep your relationship strong.

Sleep problems

Not being able to sleep (insomnia) is a common symptom of depression — but so is oversleeping. Sleeping too much or too little can’t cause depression, but it does play a role in how you feel overall. If you’re having sleep problems, talk to your doctor. There are things you can do to help your body settle into a healthy sleep schedule.

Bipolar disorder

Also known as manic depression, bipolar disorder is characterized by extreme changes in mood. People experience intense highs and lows — cycling between mania (heightened energy) and depression. Bipolar disorder is treatable, but it’s treated differently than depression. If you think you may be experiencing mania, talk to your doctor.

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